All Posts in News

15/08/2019

Laura Carmichael for Phoenix Mag

Meeting Lady Edith, middle child and serial rebel of Downton Abbey’s aristocratic Crawley family, is a rather intimidating proposition. Laura Carmichael, the 33-year-old actress who has played Edith since 2010, has perfected both her patrician withering look and her cutting put-downs. The character has never been one to suffer fools gladly.

So it’s enormously calming when Carmichael bounds over, halfway through her intensive PHOENIX shoot, to say hello. “I love this stuff,” she says. “it’s so glam!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

01/08/2019

Jeremy Paxman for C5

I was asked to create both Advertising and editorial images for a new show presented by Jeremy Paxman on channel 5 - 'Why are our politicians so crap'

Featuring Rachel Johnson and Jonathan Aitken the one off show focused on the current state of politics in Britain.

 

 

18/07/2019

Misty as Shudu

To shoot a recent digital supermodel feature for Phoenix Magazine I was asked to photograph a studio session with a model for the artist to render in the digital creation.

Below are the images from our shoot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18/07/2019

Phoenix July Cover

Phoenix magazine's July cover featured Shudu

Shudu has the body of a goddess, impossibly tall and lean, with glowing ebony skin. She wears her hair in a short, natural afro style and appears confident but approachable. As an influencer she has 177,000 followers on instagram and counting, recently shot a campaign with global sports brand Ellesse, has worked with high-end fashion house Balmain,and walked the red carpet at the BAFTA Awards in a partnership with EE. Shudu is also not a real person. She’s the creation of photographer and retoucher Cameron James Wilson, a long time PHOENIX collaborator, whose personal side project has now taken on a life of its own, literally.

 

05/07/2019

Cotton Farmers for Google AI

Google believe that artificial intelligence can provide new ways of approaching problems and meaningfully improve people’s lives. In an initiative to support organizations that are using the power of AI to address social and environmental challenges Google organised the Impact challenge. I was asked to photograph Wadhwani AI who were shortlisted to receive Google support and funding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

01/07/2019

Google AI Project Uganda

Google believe that artificial intelligence can provide new ways of approaching problems and meaningfully improve people’s lives. In an initiative to support organizations that are using the power of AI to address social and environmental challenges Google organised the Impact challenge. I was asked to photograph scientists from Makerere University Uganda who were shortlisted to receive Google support and funding.

 

 

 

16/06/2019

Recruitment Campaign for BP

In the first leg of a worldwide campaign photographing BP staff for a new recruitment campaign and in house library, we visited various sites in the UK and europe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02/06/2019

Portraits for STAMMA.ORG

I was asked by The British Stammering Association to take some portraits of their members for a website and brand update to STAMMA.org

I knew very little about stammering before I was asked to take these pictures, it is a very under represented and little understood condition.
About 8% of children will stammer at some point, but most will go on to talk fluently. For up to 3% of adults it will be a lifelong condition. Stammering affects mainly men and every ethnicity.
There is no link between stammering and intellectual capacity. Like other neurological conditions, it covers a spectrum, everyone stammers differently and to different degrees. For some there’ll be periods of their life when they stammer less and others when they will struggle to speak. Many find that as they get older the condition improves.

Stammering has been used as a device to make people laugh and to indicate dishonesty or low intelligence. This stereotyping, and the frustration caused by the difficulty of talking with others, has led many to avoid stammering and find ways of sounding ‘normal’. You may know someone who stammers ‘a little’, or be surprised to hear that someone you know well tells you that they stammer. Societal expectations mean that people will often try to avoid stammering. They will anticipate speaking situations and plan for them. They may swap a word they expect to stammer on. Or they may keep what they say to the bare minimum. They may arrive late to a meeting to avoid introducing themselves.

The physical act of stammering can be a tiny part of the experience. The bigger part is often the mental machinations that someone who stammers endures. Anticipating times when they'll need to talk, the negative responses, the ever-present expectation that they need fixing or just need to breathe properly. Feelings of shame, embarrassment, anger, anxiety and fear. Frustration that saying one’s name – the one thing that most people who stammer will find hard to say – will stymie their every encounter. The frustration of not being taken seriously.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16/05/2019

Charlie Howard for Phoenix magazine

When Charlie Howard published a frank open letter to her ex modelling agency on social media in 2015, it kick-started a conversation about modelling ethics, body image and mental health that would ripple through her industry and change her career forever. Phoenix Mag interviewed this lovely human and super-polymath (these days she’s a model-activist-author-podcaster) in The Holiday Issue for SS19